Nijay Gupta

Nijay Gupta

Reviews

Johnson, Luke Timothy. The First and Second Letters to Timothy. AYB. Yale University Press, 2001.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta October 11, 2019
In this technical study of 1-2 Timothy (Titus is not included in his volume), Johnson offers one of the most extensive arguments in favor of Pauline authorship of these texts. The commentary itself presents Johnson’s thoughtful exegetical discussion of the text, which is historical-critical in general, but also attentive to important theological questions. [Full Review]
Marshall, I. Howard. The Pastoral Epistles. ICC. T&T Clark, 1999.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta October 11, 2019
Marshall has written numerous NT commentaries and is also an expert in Pauline theology. In this multi-volume set, Marshall places a heavy focus on historical-critical analysis and examination of the Greek text. But he does not neglect key theological conversations. He argues that Paul did not write these letters, and that a better term for this situation is “allonymity”—not false authorship, but authorship by another person. The author of these letters, according to Marshall, had no deceptive intention. [Full Review]
Towner, Philip H. The Letters to Timothy and Titus. NICNT. Eerdmans, 2006.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta October 11, 2019
Towner has devoted many years to the study of these letters and is considered an expert within the evangelical tradition. Towner offers robust arguments for Pauline authorship, plausible theories about the situations behind these texts, and is thoughtful about the theological relevance of their messages for today. [Full Review]
Dunn, James D. G. “Pastoral Epistles” in Second Corinthians - Philemon. NIB. Abingdon Press, 2000.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta October 11, 2019
Dunn engages in his usual exegetical and theological perceptivity, offering one of the more valuable contributions to the study of the Pastorals that is sadly buried within NIB volume 11 (often not reviewed because it contains several Pauline letters examined by different scholars in one volume). [Full Review]
Kelly, J. N. D. The Pastoral Epistles. BNTC. Hendrickson Publishers, 1993.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta October 11, 2019
Kelly, a late 20th-century scholar of early Christianity, offers a wise and balanced albeit brief study of the Pastorals. [Full Review]
Spencer, Aída Besançon. Bird, Michael F.; Keener, Craig S. eds. 2 Timothy and Titus. NCCS. Wipf & Stock, 2014.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta October 11, 2019
Spencer is especially known for her scholarship on 2 Corinthians and her work on the subject of women in Scripture. [Full Review]
Spencer, Aída Besançon. 1 Timothy. NCCS. Cascade Books, 2013.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta October 11, 2019
Spencer is especially known for her scholarship on 2 Corinthians and her work on the subject of women in Scripture. [Full Review]
Wall, Robert W.; Steele, Richard B. 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus. THNTC. Eerdmans, 2012.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta October 11, 2019
Wall, who is well known for his “canonical” reading of Scripture, is responsible for the theological exposition of the Pastorals in the commentary. Steele, a historical theologian, adds insightful case studies in the interpretation of these texts. [Full Review]
Fee, Gordon D. 1 and 2 Timothy, Titus. UBNT. Hendrickson Publishers, 1989.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta October 11, 2019
This is a very short volume, but in spite of its modest size it contains Fee’s typical energetic style. I find myself returning to this commentary often for sensible exposition of the Pauline text. [Full Review]
Oden, Thomas C. First and Second Timothy and Titus. IBC. Westminster John Knox Press, 1989.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta October 11, 2019
Well-known Methodist theologian Thomas Oden offers a more thematic approach in his accessible study of Pastorals. Oden focuses on the following themes: the authority of the apostolic tradition, Christian preaching, pastoral care, and “the right ordering of ministry.” [Full Review]
Towner, Philip H. 1 & 2 Timothy & Titus. IVPNTC. InterVarsity Press, 1994.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta October 11, 2019
This lay-level commentary is a concise version of Towner’s NICNT commentary. [Full Review]
Trebilco, Paul R.; Rae, Simon. 1 Timothy. ABC. Asia Theological Association, 2008.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta October 11, 2019
Paul Trebilco, a recognized social historian of early Christianity, has produced a helpful (albeit brief) commentary on 1 Timothy for the Asia Bible Commentary series. [Full Review]
Bruce, F. F. 1 and 2 Thessalonians. WBC. Thomas Nelson, 1982.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta September 27, 2019
While this is a bit of an older commentary (1982), Bruce has a remarkable grasp of Greco-Roman and Jewish literature. He offers a careful exegetical analysis of both letters. [Full Review]
Fee, Gordon D. The First and Second Letters to the Thessalonians. NICNT. Eerdmans, 2009.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta September 27, 2019
This commentary offers the expected blend of careful exposition, penetrating theological engagement, and wise application to ministry that is the trademark of a “Gordon Fee” commentary. [Full Review]
Malherbe, Abraham J. The Letters to the Thessalonians. AYB. Yale University Press, 2000.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta September 27, 2019
Malherbe spent a career making significant academic contributions on 1-2 Thessalonians, especially in relation to the Greco-Roman world. [Full Review]
Wanamaker, Charles A. The Epistles to the Thessalonians. NIGTC. Eerdmans, 1990.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta September 27, 2019
Wanamaker offers one of the more in-depth Greek commentaries. He argues for and applies rhetorical criticism to the Thessalonian correspondence. Wanamaker’s commentary is not as widely acclaimed as Malherbe or Fee, partly because Wanamaker argues that canonical 2 Thessalonians was written by Paul first (thus canonical 1 Thessalonians would be the later letter). [Full Review]
Weima, Jeffrey A. D. 1-2 Thessalonians. BECNT. Baker Academic, 2014.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta September 27, 2019
Normally I put the BECNT volumes in the semi-technical category, but Weima is a leading expert in Thessalonian scholarship and brings significant depth to his commentary. [Full Review]
Green, Gene L. The Letters to the Thessalonians. PNTC. Eerdmans, 2002.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta September 27, 2019
Green’s strengths lie in a close reading of the Greek text and his mastery of the socio-historical setting of ancient Thessalonica. [Full Review]
Witherington III, Ben. 1 and 2 Thessalonians: A Socio-Rhetorical Commentary. SRC. Eerdmans, 2006.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta September 27, 2019
Witherington applies his “socio-rhetorical” method to the Thessalonian epistles. [Full Review]
Byron, John. 1–2 Thessalonians. SGBC. Zondervan Academic, 2014.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta September 27, 2019
Byron represents cutting-edge scholarly wisdom in this accessible commentary, but the strength of the SoGBC series is how it connects the ancient text to Christian theology and life today. Byron makes connections between the Thessalonian letters and the lives and writings of figures like Luther, Bonhoeffer, and Mother Teresa. [Full Review]
Gaventa, Beverly Roberts. First and Second Thessalonians. IBC. Westminster John Knox Press, 1998.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta September 27, 2019
Gaventa masterfully provides a theological exposition of these letters. She gives special attention to the maternal imagery in these texts (and in Paul in general) and she also addresses Paul’s eschatology more broadly. [Full Review]
Johnson, C. Andrew. 1 and 2 Thessalonians. THNTC. Eerdmans, 2016.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta September 27, 2019
Johnson brings a Wesleyan perspective to the study of 1-2 Thessalonians. His exposition of these letters is excellent. In the “Theological Horizons” section of the commentary he addresses the oft-neglected themes of holiness, mission in biblical theology, and eschatology. [Full Review]
Holmes, Michael W. 1 and 2 Thessalonians. NIVAC. Zondervan, 1998.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta September 27, 2019
Holmes is a textual criticism expert, but offers here a well-rounded, devotion- and application-oriented commentary for laypeople. [Full Review]
Gupta, Nijay K. 1-2 Thessalonians. NCCS. Wipf & Stock, 2016.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta September 27, 2019
While he was too humble to include it himself, the Editors would like to make a special mention of Gupta’s own exceptional contribution to the recent commentaries on 1 & 2 Thessalonians. It speaks for itself, even if he defers. [Full Review]
Barth, Markus; Blanke, Helmut. Colossians. AYB. Yale University Press, 1995.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta September 13, 2019
Barth has written several excellent technical commentaries. He has a knack for blending textual and historical analysis with theological reflection. [Full Review]
Dunn, James D. G. The Epistles to the Colossians and to Philemon. NIGTC. Eerdmans, 1996.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta September 13, 2019
Dunn is a seasoned commentary writer, with Romans as his most well-known volume (WBC). He brings the same attention to detail to Colossians, combined with penetrating theological analysis. In this commentary, Dunn proposes that perhaps someone else (like Timothy) wrote Colossians at Paul’s behest. [Full Review]
Pao, David W. Arnold, Clinton E. ed. Colossians and Philemon. ZECNT. Zondervan, 2012.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta September 13, 2019
Pao has written on Luke-Acts, the use of the Old Testament in the New, and the theme of “thanksgiving” in Paul. Pao is a careful and fair-minded scholar who represents well the state of evangelical scholarship. [Full Review]
Wilson, Robert McLachlan. Colossians And Philemon. ICC. T&T Clark, 2005.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta September 13, 2019
Wilson was a widely-respected scholar of early Christianity. Like other ICC volumes, this is primarily a scholar’s resource for detailed discussion of textual questions, relationship to comparative literature, and history of interpretation [Full Review]
Beale, G. K. Colossians, Philemon. BECNT. Baker Academic, 2019.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta September 13, 2019
Beale is most well-known as a scholar of the book of Revelation, but has written thematically on biblical theology, and has published other Pauline commentaries. What he brings to the study of Colossians is his extensive knowledge of early Jewish and Christian eschatology. [Full Review]
Moo, Douglas J. The Letters to the Colossians and to Philemon. PNTC. Eerdmans, 2008.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta September 13, 2019
Moo is recognized widely as an expert on Romans, and here he offers his detailed exposition of Colossians. [Full Review]
McKnight, Scot. The Letter to the Colossians. NICNT. Eerdmans, 2018.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta September 13, 2019
McKnight has a masterful way of both analyzing the text carefully, as well as drawing out theological ideas that aims to shape the church today. [Full Review]
Thompson, Marianne Meye. Colossians & Philemon. THNTC. Eerdmans, 2005.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta September 13, 2019
Thompson’s book was the inaugural volume of the THNT series, which attempts to bridge biblical studies and theology. In the “theological horizons” section of the commentary, Thompson relates Colossians to Paul’s theology more generally, especially his Christology and eschatology. [Full Review]
Bird, Michael F. Colossians and Philemon. NCCS. Cascade Books, 2009.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta September 13, 2019
Bird, a respected New Testament theologian, offers a readable “state-of-the-discipline” exposition of Colossians. [Full Review]
Garland, David E. Colossians, Philemon. NIVAC. Zondervan, 1998.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta September 13, 2019
As is to be expected of his work in general, Garland offers a richly rewarding study of Colossians with a view towards personal spiritual formation and application today. [Full Review]
Lincoln, Andrew T. “Colossians” in Second Corinthians - Philemon. NIB. Abingdon Press, 2000.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta September 13, 2019
Andrew Lincoln has distinguished himself as a leading scholar on Ephesians, so—given its literary relationship—it is natural he would have many insights on the study of Colossians. [Full Review]
Fee, Gordon D. Paul's Letter to the Philippians. NICNT. Eerdmans, 1995.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta August 30, 2019
Fee’s 1995 commentary has stood the test of time as a wise and mature treatment of Philippians, that relates Paul’s zeal for the work and mission of Christ to theology and ministry today. [Full Review]
Hellerman, Joseph H. Köstenberger, Andreas J.; Yarbrough, Robert W. eds. Philippians. EGGNT. B&H Academic, 2015.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta August 30, 2019
In his wider body of work on Philippians (monographs, essays, articles), I consider Hellerman to have a better grasp on Roman Philippi than any other biblical scholar. If you plan to dig into the Greek text in depth, this is a perfect companion. [Full Review]
Hawthorne, Gerald F.; Martin, Ralph P. Philippians (Rev. ed.). WBC. Thomas Nelson, 2004.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta August 30, 2019
Hawthorne and Martin offer a comprehensive and in-depth analysis of Philippians, primarily from a grammatical-historical perspective. Their work represents engagement with scholarship of a previous generation. While I have found it still very valuable, it should be complemented by a more recent treatment. [Full Review]
Holloway, Paul A. Philippians. Herm. Fortress Press, 2017.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta August 30, 2019
Holloway argues that Philippians should be read as an ancient letter of consolation. Holloway is especially strong in relating Paul to the Greco-Roman philosophers of his time, but this sometimes makes Paul himself seem like a Stoic in Christian clothing. [Full Review]
Reumann, John H. P. Philippians. AYB. Yale University Press, 2008.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta August 30, 2019
Reumann had written extensively on Philippians before publishing this commentary. And his knowledge of the text and related scholarship is evident in this massive tome. But the reader should be warned that the style of writing of the commentary makes it more like a dictionary than a readable “commentary.” It serves best as a guide to a particular verse or section. I should also mention that Reumann treats canonical Philippians as a composite of three separate Pauline letters. [Full Review]
Bockmuehl, Markus. The Epistle to the Philippians. BNTC. Hendrickson Publishers, 1998.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta August 30, 2019
It is unfortunate that Bockmuehl has not written more biblical commentaries, as this one is of extraordinary value, especially given its modest size. Bockmuehl is careful, balanced, well-informed, and theologically sharp. For a quick guide to exegetical matters, he proves consistently reliable. [Full Review]
Fowl, Stephen E. Philippians. THNTC. Eerdmans, 2005.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta August 30, 2019
Fowl’s commentary was one of the earliest volumes in the THNT series. He models this series’ aims, since he was one of the chief architects of the “theological interpretation of Scripture” movement (along with people like Joel Green and Walter Moberly). In the “Theological Horizons” section of the commentary, Fowl devotes significant space to the theme of friendship in Philippians, and Christian theology. [Full Review]
Hooker, Morna D. “Philippians” in Second Corinthians - Philemon. NIB. Abingdon Press, 2000.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta August 30, 2019
Hooker, an eminent Pauline theologian, offers a careful and thoughtful study of Philippians with some pointers towards theological meaning for today. Hooker is a fresh thinker who does not buy into “consensus” views in Pauline studies. She is more than willing to step out on her own, and also to call out what she considers weak scholarship. Her major contributions to Pauline theology have included both an emphasis on union with Christ (which she calls “interchange”), and an interest in Adam Christology in Paul. [Full Review]
Witherington III, Ben. Paul's Letter to the Philippians: A Socio-Rhetorical Commentary. SRC. Eerdmans, 2011.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta August 30, 2019
Witherington deploys his “socio-rhetorical” approach to Philippians in his commentary, unpacking the letter’s message and meaning in its socio-historical context, with special interest in rhetorical features used by Paul. [Full Review]
Bruce, F. F. Philippians. UBNT. Hendrickson Publishers, 1989.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta August 30, 2019
This short commentary by Bruce offers an insightful study of Philippians from an evangelical legend. [Full Review]
Cohick, Lynn H. Longman III, Tremper; McKnight, Scot. eds. Philippians. SGBC. Zondervan, 2013.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta August 30, 2019
Cohick brings to this layperson-oriented commentary both her expertise in the Greco-Roman and Jewish world of the first century as well as a broad range of ministry and life experiences, including teaching overseas at a theological college in Kenya. [Full Review]
Craddock, Fred B. Philippians. IBC. Westminster John Knox Press, 1984.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta August 30, 2019
Craddock’s discussion of Philippians is not as comprehensive as a traditional commentary, but his insights into the meaning and theology of this letter are deeply enriching. [Full Review]
Fee, Gordon D. Philippians. IVPNTC. InterVarsity Press, 1999.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta August 30, 2019
Fee skillfully distilled his larger commentary down to a size and level that is useful for non-specialists. [Full Review]
Flemming, Dean. Philippians: A Commentary in the Wesleyan Tradition. NBBC. Beacon Hill Press of Kansas City, 2009.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta August 30, 2019
Dean Flemming offers a deeply engaging, short commentary on Philippians in the New Beacon Bible Commentary series. Flemming is not only a reliable New Testament scholar, but he has expertise in mission and theology in the New Testament. [Full Review]
Arnold, Clinton E. Ephesians. ZECNT. Zondervan, 2010.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta August 9, 2019
Arnold has made a name for himself in the subject matter of the historical, cultural, and religious environments of the early Christians. When it comes to Ephesians and Ephesus, his commentary attempts to shed light on the religious landscape of Asia Minor and ancient Ephesus in particular. [Full Review]
Lincoln, Andrew T. Ephesians. WBC. Thomas Nelson, 1990.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta August 9, 2019
This commentary is widely regarded as a classic. Lincoln is thorough and judicious. The “explanation” sections of the commentary offer expert guidance through the flow of this letter. [Full Review]
Barth, Markus. Ephesians. 2 Vols. AYB. Yale University Press, 1974.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta August 9, 2019
Barth, son of theologian Karl Barth, offers a helpful continental perspective on the study of Ephesians. His work is richly detailed and he is sensitive to theological matters in the text. [Full Review]
Fowl, Stephen E. Ephesians. NTL. Westminster John Knox Press, 2012.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta August 9, 2019
Fowl is one of the most skilled and respected Pauline theologians in the academy. While his work on Ephesians is rather brief, he demonstrates well his own way of reading texts theologically and canonically. [Full Review]
Thielman, Frank S. Ephesians. BECNT. Baker Academic, 2010.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta August 9, 2019
Thielman is a widely-respected Pauline scholar in the Reformed tradition. His expertise is especially geared towards Paul’s theology of the Law and his use of the Old Testament. [Full Review]
Bruce, F. F. The Epistles to the Colossians, to Philemon, and to the Ephesians. NICNT. Eerdmans, 1984.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta August 9, 2019
Bruce’s exquisite commentary is packaged together with Colossians and Philemon. Therefore, the section on Ephesians is rather brief, but I recommend owning every commentary Bruce has written! His historical knowledge is encyclopedic and his theological insight often incisive. He is from an earlier generation, so his work does not engage the latest debates and controversies (e.g., Paul and politics). [Full Review]
Cohick, Lynn H. Ephesians. NCCS. Cascade Books, 2010.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta August 9, 2019
Cohick offers a cogent exposition of Ephesians. Her expertise is in situating Paul within the Jewish and Greco-Roman world. She has written the revised NICNT commentary on Ephesians (forthcoming), which will offer a more comprehensive scholarly treatment of this letter with more direct interaction with academic scholarship. [Full Review]
Snodgrass, Klyne. Ephesians. NIVAC. Zondervan, 1996.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta August 9, 2019
Snodgrass supplies a well-balanced reading of Ephesians that offers hermeneutical wisdom and suggestions for applying the ancient text for today. [Full Review]
Roberts, Mark D. Ephesians. SGBC. Zondervan, 2016.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta August 9, 2019
Roberts has doctoral training in New Testament and Christian origins from Harvard and has extensive experience in full-time pastoral ministry. He brings a blend of scholarship and church-life wisdom to this very readable commentary. [Full Review]
deSilva, David A. The Letter to the Galatians. NICNT. Eerdmans, 2018.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta July 26, 2019
This commentary offers one of the most up-to-date discussion of the key exegetical issues that scholars discuss in the study of Galatians. He is a fair-minded and well-balanced scholar. deSilva also wrote the Baylor Handbook on the Greek New Testament for Galatians [Full Review]
Keener, Craig S. Galatians: A Commentary. Baker Academic, 2018.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta July 26, 2019
Keener’s historical, cultural, and theological knowledge is encyclopaedic and his views meticulously researched. Like deSilva, Keener is always fair and balanced. This Baker commentary is an expansion of a previous commentary on Galatians he wrote recently. [Full Review]
Schreiner, Thomas R. Arnold, Clinton E. ed. Galatians. ZECNT. Zondervan, 2010.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta July 26, 2019
This commentary series examines the Greek text closely; Schreiner affirms and defends a more traditional approach to Paul and the Law. [Full Review]
Martyn, J. Louis. Galatians. AYB. Yale University Press, 1997.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta July 26, 2019
Lou Martyn is a legend in New Testament studies, especially known for promoting an “apocalyptic Paul” reading of Galatians. This large commentary is provocative, sometimes quirky and idiosyncratic, but also astonishing and refreshing. He famously defends the “faithfulness of Jesus Christ” reading of pistis christou. [Full Review]
Dunn, James D. G. The Epistle to the Galatians. BNTC. Hendrickson Publishers, 1993.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta July 26, 2019
This is an important commentary because it was the first thorough working out of the New Perspective on Paul (NPP) in a Galatians commentary. But it offers much, much more. Dunn is also thoughtful about how the text leads to growth and health in the Christian life today, which he addresses often with light touches. [Full Review]
Moo, Douglas J. Yarbrough, Robert W.; Stein, Robert H. eds. Galatians. BECNT. Baker Academic, 2013.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta July 26, 2019
Moo offers a traditional Reformation (Lutheran) reading of Galatians that focuses on faith vs. doing, and justification/righteousness as a status of “in the right” with God. [Full Review]
de Boer, Martinus C. Galatians. NTL. Westminster John Knox Press, 2011.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta July 26, 2019
This sizable commentary by Martin deBoer is similar to that of Martyn in perspective (apocalyptic Paul). De Boer is one of the most widely read and respected European Pauline scholars today. [Full Review]
Hays, Richard B. “Galatians” in Second Corinthians - Philemon. NIB. Abingdon Press, 2000.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta July 26, 2019
In my discussion of 1 Corinthians commentaries (see earlier post here), I mentioned that Hays has only written two commentaries; this is the other one, and it is another goldmine. It is exegetically careful, theologically rich, and thoughtful about the relevance of Paul’s messages for today. Hays is sometimes included in the “New Perspective on Paul,” but he also has “apocalyptic” dimensions to his approach to Paul. [Full Review]
Oakes, Peter. Galatians. PAI. Baker Academic, 2015.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta July 26, 2019
Oakes offers one of the most readable and insightful Galatians commentaries ever written, and he is widely respected as expert ancient historian. [Full Review]
Jervis, L. Ann. Galatians. UBNT. Hendrickson Publishers, 1999.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta July 26, 2019
There are few gems in the Hendrickson/Baker “NIBC” series, and Jervis’ is one of them. She treats participation in Christ as a more central theme to Galatians than justification by faith. [Full Review]
McKnight, Scot. Galatians. NIVAC. Zondervan, 1995.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta July 26, 2019
McKnight has a strong sense of the history of interpretation of Paul, and Galatians in particular. He is also sensitive to issues facing the Church and the Christian life today. [Full Review]
Harris, Murray J. The Second Epistle to the Corinthians. NIGTC. Eerdmans, 2005.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta July 5, 2019
In a review, Craig Blomberg once referred to this meticulously detailed commentary as a perfect specimen of “historical-grammatical-lexical” exegesis. This is an apt description. Harris does not engage with new methods or approaches to 2 Corinthians; he sticks to classic commentary-style discussion of Greek text and meaning. If you want a sturdy guide to the Greek text, this is it. In 2007, Harris published a more popular-level version of his work, focusing on the flow of the text in REBC (Revised Expositor’s Bible Commentary). Amongst the technical commentaries I mention, Harris is the only one that believes 2 Corinthians as we have it today began as one whole letter. [Full Review]
Furnish, Victor Paul. II Corinthians. AYB. Yale University Press, 1984.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta July 5, 2019
Furnish has a solid reputation as a Pauline scholar. He published this commentary in 1984, so it can feel rather outdated, but his work is still worth consulting. He has expertise in analyzing the social background and situation in Corinth, and he is also interested in theological issues in the text related to suffering and Christology. [Full Review]
Thrall, Margaret E. 2 Corinthians. 2 Vols. ICC. T&T Clark, 1994.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta July 5, 2019
Like many scholars, Thrall argues that 2 Corinthians is a composite of 3 Pauline letters. This two-volume set is very detailed; she leaves no exegetical issue untouched. It would be difficult to utilize her work for a panoramic perspective on the whole letter—it serves better as a reference guide to debates on certain verses or words. [Full Review]
Martin, Ralph P. 2 Corinthians (Rev. ed.). WBC. Zondervan, 2014.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta July 5, 2019
Some people find the format of the WBC clumsy, but that should not stop readers from engaging with Martin’s well-balanced treatment. Caution: it was not comprehensively revised in 2014, only partially supplemented, so it represents a bit of an older era of scholarship. [Full Review]
Harris, Murray J. The Second Epistle to the Corinthians. NIGTC. Eerdmans, 2005.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta July 5, 2019
In a review, Craig Blomberg once referred to this meticulously detailed commentary as a perfect specimen of “historical-grammatical-lexical” exegesis. This is an apt description. Harris does not engage with new methods or approaches to 2 Corinthians; he sticks to classic commentary-style discussion of Greek text and meaning. If you want a sturdy guide to the Greek text, this is it. In 2007, Harris published a more popular-level version of his work, focusing on the flow of the text in REBC (Revised Expositor’s Bible Commentary). Amongst the technical commentaries I mention, Harris is the only one that believes 2 Corinthians as we have it today began as one whole letter. [Full Review]
Guthrie, George H. 2 Corinthians. BECNT. Baker Academic, 2015.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta July 5, 2019
Guthrie’s commentary is one of the most readable and useful commentaries for pastors who want clear exposition, fair judgements on debated issues, and sensitivity to life issues in ministry today. He provides a sensible theory of Paul’s opponents that has helped me better navigate this letter. [Full Review]
Garland, David E. 2 Corinthians. NAC. Broadman & Holman, 1999.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta July 5, 2019
In the previous post, I recommended owning Garland’s 1 Corinthians (BECNT) commentary; this would make a nice complement, albeit in a different series. It is less technical than the BECNT series, but still brings Garland’s characteristic theological insight and pastoral wisdom, along with trenchant exegetical analysis. This is almost always the first commentary I consult on 2 Corinthians for exegetical and theological matters. [Full Review]
Matera, Frank J. II Corinthians. NTL. Presbyterian Publishing, 2003.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta July 5, 2019
You will find that I am a fan of Matera, who is always looking at the forest of a NT book and not getting too lost in the trees. He keeps the commentary focused on the most important issues that contribute to a smooth reading of the letter. He makes sensible, balanced exegetical decisions. [Full Review]
Hafemann, Scott J. 2 Corinthians. NIVAC. Zondervan, 2000.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta July 5, 2019
Hafemann has become a leading expert in the area of “whole-Bible” biblical theology. This lay-level commentary packs a powerful theological punch for its modest size. [Full Review]
Best, Ernest. Second Corinthians. IBC. Westminster John Knox Press, 1987.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta July 5, 2019
Best is a respected Pauline scholar from a former era of biblical studies. This commentary might feel a bit outdated in language (1984), but is still worth consulting. He moves almost seamlessly from textual issues to theology and modern reflection. [Full Review]
Dunn, James D. G. Romans. 2 Vols. WBC. Thomas Nelson, 1988.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta June 7, 2019
This two-volume set offers a “New Perspective” interpretation of Romans, but Dunn’s verse-by-verse study of the Greek text showcases his exegetical and theological brilliance far beyond the singular NPP/OPP debate. [Full Review]
Jewett, Robert. Romans. Herm. Fortress Press, 2006.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta June 7, 2019
Famously, Jewett worked on this commentary for a quarter of a century. His expertise is in socio-historical contextualization of biblical texts. The series is critically acclaimed—and this volume is very important indeed—but pastors should know the Hermeneia series is self-described as non-confessional and does not generally take interest in modern application (though there are occasional exceptions). [Full Review]
Longenecker, Richard N. The Epistle to the Romans. NIGTC. Eerdmans, 2016.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta June 7, 2019
This is a massive in-depth study of the Greek text of Romans. Longenecker is widely respected and known to be fair and balanced in his exegetical decisions. Longenecker sticks close to focusing on interpreting the text and not crossing swords with other commentators or Pauline theologians much. [Full Review]
Moo, Douglas J. The Epistle to the Romans. NICNT. Eerdmans, 1996.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta June 7, 2019
Now in its second edition, this is widely-known and appreciated as a carefully researched commentary with attention to the Greek text, but also offers Moo’s perspective on key issues in Pauline theology. Moo presents and defends a traditional/Reformational approach to Romans. [Full Review]
Matera, Frank J. Romans. PAI. Baker Academic, 2010.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta June 7, 2019
Matera has excellent exegetical sensibilities and this series includes a nice (albeit brief) set of theological reflections at the end of each segment of commentary. If you have trouble following Paul’s flow of thought in Romans, Matera comes to the rescue. [Full Review]
Wright, N. T. “Romans” in Acts - First Corinthians. NIB. Abingdon Press, 2002.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta June 7, 2019
At 700 pages, this can seem like an intimidating commentary, but Wright has an engaging writing style. In some ways he represents the New Perspective on Paul, but the best way to explain it is this: “Wright is Wright” (often brilliant, but not always right). [Full Review]
Keener, Craig S. Romans. NCCS. Cascade Books, 2009.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta June 7, 2019
Keener’s expertise is putting Paul’s writings in ancient context. He is objective at all times (perhaps to a fault! Get angry, Doc!). He is a great counter-balance to both Moo and Wright, like a scholarly referee. [Full Review]
Bird, Michael F. Romans. SGBC. Zondervan, 2016.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta June 7, 2019
It’s just fun to read MFB. He’s clever, he’s witty, and has many flashes of interpretive brilliance. He often bridges OPP and NPP and he brings a non-American (Australian) perspective to the study of Paul. [Full Review]
Achtemeier, Paul J. Romans. IBC. Westminster John Knox Press, 1986.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta June 7, 2019
This is not quite a commentary, but almost like a series of theological lectures on Romans. Still, Achtemeier is a deep thinker and great communicator representing a more mainline perspective. [Full Review]
Moo, Douglas J. Romans. NIVAC. Zondervan, 2000.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta June 7, 2019
This is a much smaller and more devotional version of his big commentary. This series includes ample reflection on modern application. [Full Review]
Burns, J. Lanier. Romans: Interpreted by Early Christian Commentators. CB. Eerdmans, 2012.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta June 7, 2019
Burns offers excerpts and explanations of how the Church Fathers read and interpreted Romans. [Full Review]
Ciampa, Roy E.; Rosner, Brian S. The First Letter to the Corinthians. PNTC. Eerdmans, 2010.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta May 21, 2019
These two scholars make a great academic team. Ciampa (one of my seminary professors) has expertise in the use of the Old Testament in Paul and also biblical translation theory and practice. Rosner wrote his doctoral dissertation on 1 Corinthians and has written extensively on Paul’s ethics. [Full Review]
Fee, Gordon D. The First Epistle to the Corinthians. NICNT. Eerdmans, 2014.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta May 21, 2019
It is hard for any other Pauline scholar to match Fee’s combination of academic knowledge, pastoral wisdom, and spiritual zeal. He is a recognized expert in textual criticism, and he is especially attuned to the presence and work of the Holy Spirit in the church according to Paul. [Full Review]
Fitzmyer, Joseph A. First Corinthians. AYB. Yale University Press, 2008.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta May 21, 2019
Fitzmyer is one of the finest and most respected New Testament scholars ever. His commentary models the historical-critical approach, where questions of historical circumstance, relationship to comparative (Jewish and Greco-Roman) literature, and Greek word meanings (diachronically and synchronically) are of the utmost importance. See my Themelios review of his commentary [Full Review]
Thiselton, Anthony C. The First Epistle to the Corinthians. NIGTC. Eerdmans, 2000.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta May 21, 2019
At 1400+ pages this is one of the most comprehensive studies of 1 Corinthians available. This series (NIGTC) is designed to give careful attention to the Greek text, and Thiselton does so admirably. But he also has expertise in systematic and historical theology, as well as philosophical hermeneutics. [Full Review]
Garland, David E. 1 Corinthians. BECNT. Baker Academic, 2003.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta May 21, 2019
Garland balances academic discussions, theological questions, and ministry application exquisitely. For the busy pastor who still wants an academic discussion, Garland is the best resource for reliable interpretation. [Full Review]
Keener, Craig S. 1–2 Corinthians. NCBC. Cambridge University Press, 2005.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta May 21, 2019
Keener offers his usual guidance to comparative ancient literature and weighs in (often briefly) on controversial theological matters. This volume covers both 1-2 Corinthians. [Full Review]
Sampley, J. Paul. “1 Corinthians” in Acts - First Corinthians. NIB. Abingdon Press, 2002.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta May 21, 2019
Sampley has written extensively on Paul’s theological ethics and brings that expertise to his commentary on 1 Corinthians. [Full Review]
Witherington III, Ben. Conflict and Community in Corinth: A Socio-Rhetorical Commentary on 1 and 2 Corinthians. SRC. Eerdmans, 1995.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta May 21, 2019
Witherington has developed his own commentary series (it is not an official series, but it is complete, as he has covered the whole New Testament through different publishers). He dubs his approach “socio-rhetorical,” combining careful consideration of the socio-historical context behind the NT text with attentiveness to the rhetorical format and forms within the text. Many, including myself, consider his best volumes in this “series” to be 1–2 Corinthians (Conflict and Community in Corinth) and Acts (The Acts of the Apostles). [Full Review]
Blomberg, Craig L. 1 Corinthians. NIVAC. Zondervan, 1995.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta May 21, 2019
Blomberg is a widely respected exegete, especially as a Gospels scholar, but here he shows his ability to work skillfully in Paul. Perhaps his greatest asset in this volume is his well-balanced approach to various thorny theological issues and his ability to unpack complex issues simply and clearly. [Full Review]
Hays, Richard B. First Corinthians. IBC. Westminster John Knox Press, 1997.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta May 21, 2019
Hays is a world-renowned Pauline scholar who has written ground-breaking works in Paul’s interaction with the Old Testament as well as Paul’s moral reasoning. He has only written a couple of commentaries, so I consider these precious commodities. Hays’ work fits well with this series, offering interpretive, theological, and preaching pointers for pastors. [Full Review]
Perkins, Pheme. First Corinthians. PAI. Baker Academic, 2012.
Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta May 21, 2019
While the Paideia series aims at a more basic level of interpretation, Perkins showcases her expertise in the Jewish and Greco-Roman world of Paul and the early Christians. [Full Review]