The Pastoral Epistles
The Pastoral Epistles
Technical
Evangelical
Critical
Egalitarian

The Pastoral Epistles

in International Critical Commentary

by I. Howard Marshall

4.89 Rank Score: 7.05 from 13 reviews, 8 featured collections, and 11 user libraries
Pages 928
Publisher T&T Clark
Published 1999
ISBN-13 9780567086617

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Nijay Gupta Nijay Gupta October 11, 2019
Marshall has written numerous NT commentaries and is also an expert in Pauline theology. In this multi-volume set, Marshall places a heavy focus on historical-critical analysis and examination of the Greek text. But he does not neglect key theological conversations. He argues that Paul did not write these letters, and that a better term for this situation is “allonymity”—not false authorship, but authorship by another person. The author of these letters, according to Marshall, had no deceptive intention. [Full Review]
Princeton Seminary Princeton Seminary December 2, 2017
 
Robert M. Bowman, Jr Robert M. Bowman, Jr December 10, 2016
Excellent commentary by the moderately evangelical, eminent British NT scholar Marshall, in collaboration with one of the top scholars on the Pastoral Epistles. [Full Review]
Tim Challies Tim Challies September 16, 2013
After commending Knight, Carson also commends Marshall and says his work is “packed with thoughtful, well-written reflection on every issue of importance.” Yet, oddly, Marshall does not believe that the epistles were written by Paul and this, not surprisingly, influences some of his interpretations. Still, it receives high recommendations and will prove valuable, especially for the teacher or preacher [Full Review]
Phillip J. Long Phillip J. Long July 3, 2012
Marshall’s contribution is perhaps the most detailed exegetical commentary on the list, as is to be expected from an ICC volume. Marshall replaced Walter Lock’s 1924 commentary in the series. The book caused a stir when it was released since Marshall (beloved by many evangelicals) rejected Pauline authorship of these letters. The introduction to the commentary develops Marshall’s view of authorship. The body of the commentary contains detailed bibliographies for each section followed by an overview of the text. The format of the commentary is a phrase-by-phrase unpacking of the Greek text, including textual, lexical and syntactical issues. He interacts with a broad range of scholarship, with Marshall includes a number of excellent excursuses (on Household Codes, in Titus, for example). [Full Review]
Scot McKnight Scot McKnight August 2, 2009
From the evangelical side, I turn to (the incredibly expensive) commentary by I. Howard Marshall [Full Review]
John Glynn John Glynn September 20, 2008
Jim Rosscup Jim Rosscup September 20, 2008
Unattributed-m Unattributed-m May 26, 2008
Unnatributed-d Unnatributed-d May 26, 2008
D. A. Carson D. A. Carson May 26, 2008