ThomasCreedy

ThomasCreedy

I'm the Editorial Director for IVP and Apollos. I hold degrees in theology, religious studies and mission. I've worked in marketing and communications, theological consultancy, and attempt to be a regular blogger and book reviewer. I'm married to Amy and we live in London with two young daughters.
Occupation Editorial Director

Reviews

Awabdy, Mark. Numbers. BCOT. Baker Academic, 2023.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy January 30, 2024
Overall, then, this commentary is something of a mixed bag. I generally like the BECOT format, and theological slant – and in this, Awabdy continues the series ‘vibe’. There was not much here to raise my eyebrows (beyond the slightly random clericalism I allude to above), but at the same time I did not feel that there was anything that particularly stirred my heart of brought evangelical engagement with the book of Numbers on, very much. There are moments of helpful connection across the Pentateuch, and those with better Hebrew than I may find more value in the textual critical aspects than I did. For preachers wanting more than Wenham’s TOTC, I think Ashley’s NICOT is a more useful technical/semi-technical commentary. That isn’t to say that Awabdy has written a bad commentary, but I can’t be much more enthusiastic than to say that this is a workmanlike commentary on a book of the Bible where we do need a genuinely excellent one. [Full Review]
Sklar, Jay A. Leviticus. TOTC. Inter-Varsity Press, 2013.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy January 22, 2024
A very good commentary on Leviticus from Jay Sklaar. Nails, in my view, the TOTC pitch, and does some good biblical-theological and ethical explanation. Ideal for the average preacher, and has made me want to see his longer ZECOT!
White, Thomas Joseph. Exodus. BTCB. Brazos Press, 2016.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy January 17, 2024
Overall, then, this isn't a commentary I'd recommend to many preachers - except perhaps those in, say, an Anglican context with some folk with Anglo-Catholic formation - beyond the outline piece. It is too tentative, not particularly textual, and Roman Catholic in a way which detracts and distracts from the text. [Full Review]
Lau, Peter H. W. The Book of Ruth. NICOT. Eerdmans, 2023.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy December 14, 2023
Some words from close to the close of Lau’s commentary sum things up: “From a theological perspective, God’s quiet providence is revealed again: he has heard and answered another prayer” (p. 305). This is a commentary that carefully and respectfully reads the book of Ruth, and the author brings a range of tools to bear. I would strongly recommend this as both an example of solid evangelical commentary on Ruth, and also as a tool for pastors looking to go deeper into this book of the Bible. [Full Review]
Adewuya, J. Ayodeji. An African Commentary on the Letter of James (Global Readings). Cascade Books, 2023.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy December 11, 2023
An ultimately disappointing shorter commentary. Overall, though, this commentary does little new, and whilst there are some useful observations that come from Adewuya’s particular African context (he does not, of course, claim to speak for a whole continent of cultures and countries) there is also an (in my view) unnecessary abundance of quotations from secondary literature, a substantial amount of which I felt added little to the commentary. I think the author could have generated a commentary of the same length with more reflection on the wisdom tradition of James, Proverbs, and the various cultural proverbs he alludes to and engages with – and this would be something that would have made this a recommended commentary for preachers, in my view. As it is, this is a workmanlike but rather underwhelming short commentary on James, which will stay on my shelf due to its small footprint, and will probably come off and be referenced when I’m looking for an ‘African’ perspective on the letter of James. [Full Review]
Gupta, Nijay K. Galatians. SGBC. Zondervan, 2023.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy December 3, 2023
Overall, then, this is in my view an excellent readable pastoral commentary on Galatians. There is some more technical stuff going on in the footnotes, but I think Gupta has nailed the SGBC target readership of pastors and ‘normal Christians’. I would recommend this to someone thinking of preaching through Galatians for the first time (alongside Neil Martin’s ‘Galatians Reconsidered’!), and also as a commentary to be used devotionally. [Full Review]
Campbell, Constantine R. The Letter to the Ephesians. PNTC. Eerdmans, 2023.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy November 29, 2023
In my view, this is an excellent mid-weight commentary on Ephesians, doing some of the technical work that a longer one like Cohick’s NICNT does, but in a package that is readable and concise. It would pair nicely with, for example, more pastoral work like John Stott’s evergreen Bible Speaks Today volume, or Bitrus A. Sarma’s Blessed New Humanity in Christ – I’m planning on reading Bock’s new TNTC next year, which I think might be quite similar in length to this PNTC volume. Campbell is to be commended for writing a thoroughgoingly theological, eminently readable, and calm commentary on Paul’s letter to the Ephesians. [Somewhat ironically, this was one of two Ephesians commentaries I read this year - the other being O'Brien's, which this replaces. If you do have, and continue to use, O'Brien's, then Campbell's is well worth getting to augment it] [Full Review]
Murray, John. The Epistle to the Romans. Westminster Seminary Press, 2022.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy November 10, 2023
Overall, then, if you have never read this commentary, and are broadly reformed or evangelical, this will do you good to own and read. If you are a preacher, Murray offers a pleasant balance of intelligent theological interpretation, and exegetical sensitivity, and this without the intervening years of scholarship (I’d suggest Moo, or Garland’s recent Tyndale Commentary, as ways to brush up on the state of scholarship since then) getting in the way of Murray’s patient, warm and encouraging writing. If I ever have the privilege of preaching Romans, Murray will be on the desk – and in other work on parts large and small of this epistle, I will be sure to turn to it. It is only it’s historic nature that prevents it from being a 5/5 commentary for me – though, as I alluded to, the physical production and editorial decisions are a 5/5 for me! [Full Review]
Bird, Michael F.; Gupta, Nijay K. Philippians. NCBC. Cambridge University Press, 2020.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy October 30, 2023
Overall, then, this is a helpful commentary on Philippians, with it's shortcomings coming from a slightly unclear series readership, and some stranger editorial choices. It left me wanting to dig deeper into the context and questions that Bird and Gupta examine, as well as wanting to think through how the epistle applies to my local church, and other situations. Paired with perhaps a longer, technical commentary (like Hansen's Pillar or Fee's NICNT) and another shorter commentary (such as Brown's new TNTC, or Motyer's classic BST) this NCBC volume is a useful tool for the pastor thinking about Philippians in wider context, of both Scripture and Paul's life and work. [Full Review]
Azad, Anwarul; Glaser, Ida. Genesis 1–11. WT. Langham Global Library, 2022.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy October 18, 2023
[Conclusion to my longer review] This is not a full critical commentary on Genesis 1-11 – I think the authors lean heavily on Wenham’s work in his Word Biblical Commentary [WBC] on the same textual selection – but there are various critical engagements, within the space constraints. This puts the reading level perhaps a little higher than a Tyndale Commentary, but more accessible by far than the aforementioned Baker Exegetical, or WBC commentaries. I think that this makes it a useful purchase for those interested in thinking about Genesis, particularly those in pastoral or other forms of ministry in Muslim-majority contexts or working with those with Islamic backgrounds. I am excited about the potential for this series to bring biblical studies into conversation with the Qur’an in a winsome evangelical way; to have the opportunity to re-read familiar texts through other peoples’ eyes, and increase the ability of Western pastors and scholars to see how other parts of the world and the church engage with texts and ideas. As this is the first volume of a new series, I hope that the niggles I had (like formatting up to 12:3 at the smaller end, and the lack of inclusion of a biblical index at the much larger end) can be ironed out and that this can be a truly global commentary, a gift to the wider church. [Full Review]
Smith, Gary V.; Sprankle, Timothy D. Zephaniah–Malachi. KC. Kregel Academic, 2020.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy October 9, 2023
This volume of the Kerux commentary series is a mixed bag – it contains distinctly average (if very readable, and peppered with both nuggets and useful information that you wouldn’t find in some commentaries, images especially) commentary in a potentially interesting format which isn’t fully exploited. As a tool for preachers it has some potential merit – though this volume on Zephaniah-Malachi didn’t make my heart sing, except for very briefly at points. As a commentary, it is probably not suitable for students and scholars – other than completists who must own/read simply everything published – though it might be an interesting secondary source for a pastoral/preaching/homiletics course on the Prophets. Overall, I was edified by it, and learnt some new things, but I wasn’t excited. I hope to examine more Kerux volumes, in both New and Old Testament books, and explore whether that is down to a series ‘vibe’, or perhaps just this volume. [Full Review]
McConville, J. Gordon. Deuteronomy. ApOTC. IVP Academic, 2002.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy September 21, 2023
This is a seriously impressive commentary on Deuteronomy - not least as McConville does a lot in a relatively short space. If I ever preach through the book, this will be at the top of the pile - and it is helpful in thinking about Deuteronomy when allusions quotations and references appear in other things I'm reading.
Ngewa, Samuel M. Galatians. H/ABCS. Hippo Books, 2010.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy September 18, 2023
Samuel M. Ngewa’s contribution to the Africa Bible Commentary series from Hippo Books/Langham (distinct from his contribution to the one-volume ABC). A lovely little commentary. Really focused interesting layout for preachers, plenty of African contextual gems to open up the text, and discussion/reflection questions. A couple of minor quibbles but definitely a good’un!
Harmon, Matthew S. Galatians. EBTC. Lexham Press, 2021.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy September 18, 2023
Matthew S. Harmon’s contribution to the Evangelical Biblical Theological Commentary’ from Lexham Academic – a gem of a devotional read from my perspective. It was my first full read of an EBTC – I loved the commentary proper. Bib/Theo themes excellent work but could’ve been more integrated. This is a great commentary for preachers in my opinion, but also doing other interesting work.
Wright, N. T. Galatians. CCF. Eerdmans, 2021.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy September 18, 2023
(Conclusion to my linked full review) As a taster for the CCF project, this is an interesting amuse-Bouche - Wright certainly shows how a balance of deep faith and informed scholarship can produce a useful resource for Christian reflection. As a commentary on Galatians, it doesn’t really do much for me that other books have - I’d suggest (As does Wright) that Craig Keener’s intense standalone commentary does pretty much everything anyone would ever need on the book (Wright writes "There is no point in reinventing Craig's many well-oiled wheels" [p. xiii], whilst Neil Martin’s recent Galatians Reconsidered is a monograph that isn’t a commentary that has a lot to say around spiritual formation and discipleship (Wright does reference Martin's earlier work on p. 276). I’m intrigued to see what the CCF series will shape up to be - and I think Wright’s entry is a good book on Galatians, but it isn’t quite the ‘great’ ‘major’ commentary it is advertised as. That, however, is probably a good thing, as the book that it is is a useful tool for preachers, and (once you get past the introduction) a helpful devotional read for thoughtful disciples. [Full Review]
Hens-Piazza, Gina. Lamentations. WC. Liturgical Press, 2017.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy September 16, 2023
This is a commentary that blends theologically concerning trajectories and conclusions with very helpful questions and suggestions. It challenged me to read the Bible differently – in the case of Lamentations to take particularly seriously the feminine personification of Zion – but also to remember that the Bible (in my view) is not to be used by us, but to speak to and shape us. I think this commentary offers a helpful perspective, but is ultimately flawed by it’s lack of clarity about who God is, what feminism is at the moment, and how we might understand what a woman is. The format is logical and workmanlike – even if the introductory pages before the commentary gets going are overlong (and could have been more normally paginated). I’ll need to read more volumes from the same series to make more technical comments, but overall I’d give it 4/5. [Full Review]
Hens-Piazza, Gina. Lamentations. WC. Liturgical Press, 2017.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy September 16, 2023
This is a commentary that blends theologically concerning trajectories and conclusions with very helpful questions and suggestions. It challenged me to read the Bible differently – in the case of Lamentations to take particularly seriously the feminine personification of Zion – but also to remember that the Bible (in my view) is not to be used by us, but to speak to and shape us. I think this commentary offers a helpful perspective, but is ultimately flawed by it’s lack of clarity about who God is, what feminism is at the moment, and how we might understand what a woman is. The format is logical and workmanlike – even if the introductory pages before the commentary gets going are overlong (and could have been more normally paginated). I’ll need to read more volumes from the same series to make more technical comments, but overall I’d give it 4/5.
Duguid, Iain M. “Ezekiel” in Isaiah–Ezekiel. ESVEC. Crossway, 2022.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy September 12, 2023
This is an excellent commentary on the book of Ezekiel, and perhaps the most cohesive of the four commentaries in this volume. I also appreciated the fact that the short bibliography that Duguid includes has comments on most of the commentaries he refers to, a feature I enjoyed in other ESVEC volumes. [Full review at link below] [Full Review]
Fyall, Robert. “Isaiah” in Isaiah–Ezekiel. ESVEC. Crossway, 2022.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy September 12, 2023
Fyall closes his commentary looking ahead: “Isaiah looked to the rule of God in which Immanuel would reveal himself in all his splendour in the new Jerusalem” (p. 416). The short bibliography (un-annotated, unlike some in other ESVEC volumes I’ve read) is useful for a ‘what next’ for the pastor and preacher. Overall, then, this is a strong shorter commentary on Isaiah. I read it alongside Paul Wegner’s new Tyndale Old Testament Commentary, and found that they complemented each other: Wegner is in my view better on the technical and exegetical stuff, whilst Fyall struck a more devotional and discipleship tone. [Full Review]
Gibson, Jonathan. “Lamentations” in Isaiah–Ezekiel. ESVEC. Crossway, 2022.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy September 12, 2023
This is a helpful shortish commentary on Lamentations - and I think offers a pastoral Reformed perspective that would be very valuable to preachers and pastors. The way that Gibson weaves in biblical theology and application is particularly good. [Full review at link] [Full Review]
Hwang, Jerry. “Jeremiah” in Isaiah–Ezekiel. ESVEC. Crossway, 2022.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy September 12, 2023
With his interesting method of thinking about the communcative style of Jeremiah, I think Hwang has written an excellent commentary on this compelling and confusing book. It certainly inspired me to dig a little deeper into the text, and that is not always the case for commentaries! [Full Review]
Kaiser, Jr., Walter C. Walking the Ancient Paths: A Commentary on Jeremiah. Lexham Press, 2019.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy September 12, 2023
This is a readable and exegetically useful commentary from Kaiser/Rata and Lexham Press. A highlight is the impressively readable and clear introduction (30 pages) to what is a substantial commentary (600+ pages) on the longest book of the Bible. I would have liked more summary material at the end of sections, but for looking at the text this is a valuable tool.
Motyer, J. Alec. The Message of James. BST. InterVarsity Press, 1985.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy August 25, 2023
Thoroughly enjoyed and appreciated this classic. Motyer is a pleasure to read. Scholarship is dated now, so pair with a more recent commentary.
Tomasino, Anthony J. Esther. EEC. Lexham Press, 2013.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy August 15, 2023
Esther is an intriguing book of the Bible – and Tomasino’s commentary made me want to preach it and study it with others – which is a good thing! The EEC is a slightly fiddly format to get to grips with, but if you stick with it then it can result in a solid, readable and usable commentary. The format perhaps works best on smaller books like Esther (I’ll be going through the Johannine letters later this year with an EEC, so we shall see!) – giving space for the author to stretch their legs and try to hear God’s voice in the text. I’d recommend this book, with the caveats that you’d probably want to pick up Debra Reid’s Tyndale Commentary (not mentioned in Tomasino’s) and Chloe T. Sun’s aforementioned Conspicious in His Absence. [Full Review]
Wegner, Paul D. Isaiah. TOTC. IVP Academic, 2021.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy August 3, 2023
This is an excellent and workmanlike commentary on Isaiah. Wegner ably replaces Motyer’s venerable Tyndale volume, and complements Motyer’s classic standalone. At a shade under 500 pages it’s fairly long (as is Isaiah!) but up to date on scholarship and comprehensively readable.
Wright, Christopher J. H. Exodus. SGBC. Zondervan, 2021.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy July 26, 2023
This was one of two commentaries on Exodus I worked through devotionally. The other was Carpenter's 2 volume Lexham Evangelical Exegetical Commentary. I think that Wright writes brilliantly and there are some gems here. I have mixed views on the Story of God format - it works but occasionally feels forced. Interested to see it with another genre of biblical text, or a New Testament book. A good commentary on Exodus - though my pick remains Desi Alexander’s AOTC.
Bray, Gerald L. The Pastoral Epistles. ITC. T&T Clark, 2019.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy July 25, 2023
Overall, I think Bray has written a fine theological commentary on the pastorals. Well written – and very readable for the most part – it occasionally could have been more tightly edited. For my purposes, it deserves a spot on the shelf, and I will refer back to it not least for careful and sustained engagement with historic interpretation. Where I’m not in agreement with Bray, I’ll need to think harder – and I’ll certainly recommend this volume as an example of theological commentary, and a helpful commentary on the Pastoral Epistles. Whilst it’s price is large, if it can be borrowed or bought on offer, I’d encourage pastors and preachers to access it if possible. [Full Review]
Heim, Knut Martin. Ecclesiastes. TOTC. IVP Academic, 2019.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy July 18, 2023
A superb little commentary. Heim takes an interesting angle informed by stand up/humour and critique of empire - makes for a really interesting read. I wanted it to be longer!
Scarlata, Mark. The Abiding Presence: A Theological Commentary on Exodus. SCM Press, 2018.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy June 22, 2023
[From the conclusion to my review] I liked this commentary. I think it reads superbly as a book, as well as being genuinely useful as a commentary. I’ll be referring back to it again and again – not just when thinking about Exodus – and recommending it widely. [Full Review]
Harrington, Hannah K. The Books of Ezra and Nehemiah. NICOT. Eerdmans, 2022.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy June 16, 2023
Whilst the interest in/focus on the development of Judaism may slightly reduce this commentary’s utility to the average preacher, I do think that it is a thorough and helpful commentary if read with discernment – not least as Harrington helps notes of God’s sovereignty/intimacy, the importance of prayer/lament/worship/family and other things sing clearly. Unlike some commentaries, it held my attention throughout, whether I agreed or not, and with the expection of the very long excursus noted above, the tangents followed were generally brief and interesting enough to not be too distracting. I will certainly have it to hand when working on Ezra/Nehemiah, and were I to preach on either, this would be quick off the shelf with Kidner and Moore. It almost feels unneccessary to allude to the excellenct production Eerdmans make of these NICOT volumes – but it is a pleasure to use. My concern/quibble at the outset about how high a view of scripture is employed here is worth noting again – not necessarily as a negative, but as an observation that this is a different kind of commentary than many readers of this blog might be looking for. That said, if you want a reasonably technical, well put together, carefully researched and spiritually-engaged commentary on Ezra/Nehemiah, then this is an excellent choice. In going back over my notes whilst writing the review, I was reminded that it was a pleasure to read, opened up these two books of Scripture to me, and that is pretty impressive for a 500+ page commentary! [Full Review]
Rata, Tiberius. Ezra and Nehemiah: A Mentor Commentary. Ment. Mentor, 2011.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy June 16, 2023
Whilst the first time reading a volume from a commentary series I haven’t encountered before would normally prompt a full review, in this case I haven’t, partly because I’m dipping into various things about Ezra/Nehemiah, and partly because I found Hannah K. Harrington’s newer NICOT volume significantly more helpful. This Mentor volume was surprisingly compact – at around 270 pages it had the opportunity to be concise – but in my opinion was not a strong volume. Large font and other strange formatting choices meant it often felt cursory – and the commentary in general didn’t feel that useful. The introduction, however, particularly at under 40 pages, was quite good, and so if you are towards the more conservative end of things, this might be a useful commentary, though I’d recommend Derek Kidner’s, and it’s forthcoming replacement, in this sort of length, and Harrington’s aforementioned NICOT if you want something comprehensive.
Guthrie, George H. 2 Corinthians. BECNT. Baker Academic, 2015.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy June 16, 2023
I like the BECNT series (and it’s Old Testament counterpart, the Genesis volume of which I reviewed early this year), and 2 Corinthians is growing on me in terms of Epistles that I find particularly spiritually nourishing. Guthrie writes well, engages robustly with the Greek, and in my view strikes a helpful balance between engagement with secondary sources, and sticking to the text at hand. It would be a solid choice for pastors and preachers wanting something more substantial as an aid to sermon preparation. 4/5
Cousar, Charles B. Philippians and Philemon. NTL. Westminster John Knox, 2009.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy June 16, 2023
This very short commentary is perfectly workmanlike but rather unexciting – it is in my view too short to say much, particularly on Philemon where it feels cursory. On Philippians I would recommend Jeannine K. Brown’s recent Tyndale New Testament Commentary and Hansen’s Pillar, whilst on Philemon I’ve been impressed by G. K. Beale’s new Baker Exegetical on Colossians and Philemon (Alan Thompson’s new Tyndale on the same pair, as well as the previous Wright volume, would also be more useful, in my view).
Braun, Roddy L. 1 Chronicles. WBC. Thomas Nelson, 1986.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy June 16, 2023
1 Chronicles is not necessarily a book that is regularly preached, dived into devotionally, or particularly popular. It is not a book I’ve heard described as a favourite by anyone, but it is part of the Bible, God’s authoritiative word, and so it is useful, instructive, and has much to teach us. I found Roddy Braun’s 1987 entry in the Word Biblical Commentary to be a helpful, and surprisingly readable guide in my devotional study of the book. The WBC is somewhat notorious for having a slightly clunky, over-realised and flow-lacking format – even by commentary standards they feel like books that are explicitly not designed to be read cover to cover. Normally, this is an irritation, and why my small collection of WBC volumes tends to be used for reference rather than reading! However, due to the text of 1 Chronicles being a blend of genres (genealogies, narrative, psalm, to name just three), this format actually helps to illuminate and open up the text of the book. [Full Review]
Leithart, Peter J. 1 and 2 Chronicles. BTCB. Brazos Press, 2019.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy April 27, 2023
Appreciated a lot of nuggets in this BTC but felt it somewhat thin as a commentary. Possibly more political than theological at points. But a useful amount of NT echo and pastoral allusion mean it’s probably worth getting hold of if preaching 1+2 Chron.
Wray Beal, Lissa M. 1 and 2 Kings. ApOTC. IVP Academic, 2014.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy April 14, 2023
[This is the conclusion from my full review] This is a superb commentary. Wray Beal is both focused on the word limits and aims of the series, and also theologically engaged in hopeful eschatological reading. Congruent with the aims of the AOTC, this volume is detailed and careful, but also readable and not impenetrable for the non-scholar, or those whose Hebrew is either non-existent or lacking. Of the Kings commentaries I’ve read all the way through (the aforementioned Leithart, Olley in the Bible Speaks Today, and Wiseman’s TOTC) this is now my favourite. I’d recommend it for someone looking to step up a gear devotionally, for pastors looking for a thoughtful commentary with helpful hopeful theology (And with both books of Kings in one volume), and for those interested in a technical evangelical engagement with the text. 5/5 [Full Review]
Lucas, Ernest C. Daniel. ApOTC. IVP Academic, 2002.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy April 13, 2023
A solid commentary on Daniel from a more conservative perspective, but with winsome engagement across various interpretative spectrums. Helpful for preachers and those looking for application (At least, more so than some more technical commentaries), Lucas is an independent thinker and this was an enjoyable read in my devotional time.
Evans, Mary J. The Message of Samuel. BST. InterVarsity Press, 2004.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy April 3, 2023
I read the (lightly) updated version of this last year and profited immensely. Evans is to be commended for striking a solid balance between reading as a woman and reading as an evangelical - as a male reader, I was impressed by her clarity and charity. A really helpful exposition of 1 and 2 Samuel.
Firth, David G. 1 and 2 Samuel. ApOTC. IVP Academic, 2009.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy April 3, 2023
This commentary is by and large vintage Firth - meticulous, well researched, and readable. That said, I did feel it was occasionally lacking in application, and at some points (particularly in his treatment of the Bathsheba story) slightly weaker than others. That said, this is a solid entry that re-opened 1 + 2 Samuel for me in my devotional times, and would be a worthwhile resource for the pastor's bookshelf, as well as representing a sensible evangelical critical approach for those with a more scholarly mind.
Thiselton, Anthony C. 1 Corinthians: A Shorter Exegetical and Pastoral Commentary. Eerdmans, 2006.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy March 27, 2023
As both a distillation of, and companion to (or even alternative to!) his NIGTC, this is a superb book. As a commentary on 1 Corinthians for pastors, preachers and Bible study leaders, it's probably going to be the one I recommend the most. Warm hearted, careful, and clear - it's an excellent example of how to write a commentary.
Phillips, Elaine A. Obadiah, Jonah and Micah. ApOTC. Apollos, 2022.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy March 20, 2023
Stunning. Seriously. This commentary opens up these three minor prophets with both serious scholarly acumen/engagement and an eye on the world. Gods Word jumps off the page to speak to global and personal issues. Elaine Phillips has done the church a great service with this entry in the AOTC. Phillips does a superb job of carefully reading the text, and a genuinely impressive job of tying the prophecy and themes of Obadiah, Jonah and Micah to some of today's issues and concerns. In that sense, this is a truly 'prophetic' commentary, which was a joy to edit and read. I'll be sure to seek out her other biblical commentaries.
Klink, III, Edward W. John. ZECNT. Zondervan, 2016.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy March 20, 2023
The Gospel of John is probably the Gospel – probably, after Galatians, the New Testament Book – I have spent the most time thinking about. Whether it was half an A-level back in 2008, sitting under a sermon series and in a CU study series in 2009-10, or undergraduate and postgraduate work between then and now, John is the Gospel I’ve spent the most time with. Since 2007/8, I’ve had a copy of Carson’s (PNTC) commentary close at hand whenever I’ve done things with John – and it continues to be a helpful reference. Recently I worked on an NSBT on a theme within John and John’s Letters – and Carson’s PNTC remained useful. So it is with some trepidation that I write, in black and white, that Klink’s ZECNT is possibly now the commentary I’d recommend to most people for most purposes. I’ll spend the rest of this review explaining why. [Full Review]
Fowl, Stephen E.; Smit, Laura A. Judges and Ruth. BTCB. Brazos Press, 2018.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy March 20, 2023
Overall, this is, as I said at the outset of my review, a book of two halves and a mixed bag. It’s probably worth buying if you are wanting to think about Judges, or preach it – and if you can find a good price then Fowl’s short comments on Ruth are a nice sweetener. But ultimately the almost cursory treatment of Ruth lets this volume down – I gave it a 3 out of 5 on GoodReads, which is being generous to the Ruth portion, and harsh to the Judges majority. [Full Review]
Firth, David G. Joshua. EBTC. Lexham Press, 2021.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy March 20, 2023
Overall, I think this is a successful commentary in that it faithfully engages the text, conforms beautifully to it’s series style, and is rich with application and inspiration/encouragement for the Christian reader of Scripture. It’s difficult to get across, though, just how unusual for a commentary this is – I read and work on lots, [Full Review]
Hawk, L. Daniel. Ruth. ApOTC. IVP Academic, 2015.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy March 20, 2023
Ruth often gets sidelined or bundled with Judges, so having a standalone volume is helpful. Hawk doesn't overstay his welcome, though, offering a readable, careful and thoughtful commentary that I believe has value for scholars and bible-studying people alike.
Fernando, Ajith. Hughes, R. Kent. ed. Deuteronomy: Loving Obedience to a Loving God. PtW. Crossway, 2012.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy March 2, 2023
Underwhelmed by this - nicely produced and some good writing, but also bloated (700 pages!) and quite a lot of assertion without reason. Not quite sure who it’s for or whether I’ll keep it or give it to someone else. Interested in alternate opinions too.
Kellum, L. Scott. Acts. EGGNT. B&H Academic, 2020.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy February 28, 2023
Both a useful commentary, and a useful aid to building a library. [Full Review]
Routledge, Robin. Hosea. TOTC. IVP Academic, 2021.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy February 24, 2023
A solid new commentary on Hosea. The introduction alone is worth buying it for.
Steinmann, Andrew E. Genesis. TOTC. IVP Academic, 2019.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy February 24, 2023
A solid commentary in a good series. Great place to start a study or series on Genesis
Schnabel, Eckhard J. Mark. TNTC. IVP Academic, 2017.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy February 24, 2023
an excellent and accessible commentary on Mark which opened up my view of this gospel, and proved an inspiring and joy-bringing read in the run-up to Christmas. I loved it because it pointed me to Jesus repeatedly, and didn’t mince words in interpretation.
Keener, Craig S. Galatians: A Commentary. Baker Academic, 2018.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy February 24, 2023
Keener is a capable and brilliant exegete – with a genuinely scary reading ability. This doorstop on Galatians is excellent – if overkill for some uses. A significant chunk of it is bibliography!
Woods, Edward J. Deuteronomy. TOTC. InterVarsity Press, 2011.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy February 24, 2023
A competent and calm commentary. Readable and pretty much hits the bullseye for a Tyndale reader. Leans quite a bit on McConville’s AOTC in whose shadow it sits. Been reading devotionally alongside Fernando’s PtW - this TOTC is much tighter and packs in a lot more technical stuff without being distracted by it.
Wilson, Walter T. Matthew 14–28. ECC. Eerdmans, 2022.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy February 13, 2023
Overall, then, this is an impressive commentary on Matthew that reads the text that we have closely, and is by and large well-engaged with the secondary literature. Practically speaking, this is a 2 volume critical commentary – and that explains the price, and also the twenty plus pages of front matter, (identical) eighty pages of bibliography in each volume, and indices of Modern Authors, Subjects, and Ancient Sources (The latter including but by no means limited to the Bible!). One does wonder if it might have been manageable to squeeze the commentary into one volume (saving 100 pages at least), though it still would have been heft! The two 600+ pages volumes end up being nice to handle and read, with managable margins and a clear layout. Eerdmans have a reputation for producing beautiful sewn hardbacks – and this ECC is no exception. [Full Review]
Wilson, Walter T. Matthew 1–13. ECC. Eerdmans, 2022.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy February 13, 2023
Overall, then, this is an impressive commentary on Matthew that reads the text that we have closely, and is by and large well-engaged with the secondary literature. Practically speaking, this is a 2 volume critical commentary – and that explains the price, and also the twenty plus pages of front matter, (identical) eighty pages of bibliography in each volume, and indices of Modern Authors, Subjects, and Ancient Sources (The latter including but by no means limited to the Bible!). One does wonder if it might have been manageable to squeeze the commentary into one volume (saving 100 pages at least), though it still would have been heft! The two 600+ pages volumes end up being nice to handle and read, with managable margins and a clear layout. Eerdmans have a reputation for producing beautiful sewn hardbacks – and this ECC is no exception. [Full Review]
Goldingay, John. Genesis. BCOT. Baker Academic, 2020.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy February 13, 2023
Overall, then, this is a helpful commentary from a broadly evangelical but also sensitively Christian and appropriately critical perspective. Goldingay’s imagery of this book as a multi part tv series makes sense, not least with emphasis throughout Genesis on interpersonal relationships. I think this BECOT volume would be straight off the shelf if I were to be preaching through or on a section of Genesis, and I’ve got a few references from it for other projects. The volume, in hardback, is nicely produced, although the BECOT visual cover style is not that exciting. If I were to sum up this commentary in a few words: readable, interesting, idiosyncratic, creative. [Full Review]
Paul, Ian. Revelation. TNTC. IVP Academic, 2018.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy February 13, 2023
A strong entry in the TNTC from a scholar who isn't afraid to challenge consensus. Very readable.
Kamell Kovalishyn, Mariam J.; Blomberg, Craig L. James. ZECNT. Zondervan, 2008.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy February 13, 2023
A very strong commentary on James - kudos to publisher, editors and both authors. Let's the ZECNT format sing.
Spencer, Aída Besançon. A Commentary on James. KEL. Kregel Academic, 2020.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy February 13, 2023
A solid conservative commentary on the letter. Slightly infuriating format gets in the way of some good exegesis, helpful application, and good writing.
Ashley, Timothy R. The Book of Numbers (2nd ed.). NICOT. Eerdmans, 2022.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy February 6, 2023
This is a thorough and helpful commentary, which by and large manages to keep moving through the complex and dense book of Numbers. Certainly it held this readers attention – and were I to be preaching Numbers, it would be off the shelf and on the desk pretty quickly. As is ever the case with Eerdmans NICOT/NICNT volumes, this is a beautifully produced hardback that is a pleasure to use. My only negative comment would be that the introduction was perhaps a little cursory – but, as ever, all commentaries are a balancing act. The back matter (indices of Authors/Subjects/Scripture and Other Ancient Texts) is thorough and helpful, and there are two interesting excurses on ‘Large Numbers’ and ‘The Levites in the Book of Numbers’. (the above is part of a longer review on my blog >>) [Full Review]
Wilson, Walter T. The Gospel of Matthew. 2 Vols. ECC. Eerdmans, 2022.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy February 6, 2023
Overall, this is an impressive commentary on Matthew that reads the text that we have closely, and is by and large well-engaged with the secondary literature. Practically speaking, this is a 2 volume critical commentary – and that explains the price, and also the twenty plus pages of front matter, (identical) eighty pages of bibliography in each volume, and indices of Modern Authors, Subjects, and Ancient Sources (The latter including but by no means limited to the Bible!). One does wonder if it might have been manageable to squeeze the commentary into one volume (saving 100 pages at least), though it still would have been heft! The two 600+ pages volumes end up being nice to handle and read, with managable margins and a clear layout. Eerdmans have a reputation for producing beautiful sewn hardbacks – and this ECC is no exception. Full review on my blog.... [Full Review]
Jeffrey, David Lyle. Luke. BTCB. Brazos Press, 2012.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy February 5, 2023
A perfectly readable but unexciting commentary - however some moments were great and Jeffrey occasionally waxes lyrical in ways that inspired my devotional reading. That’s why it’s 4 stars not 3.
Kiuchi, Nobuyoshi. Leviticus. ApOTC. IVP Academic, 2007.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy February 2, 2023
This is an excellent commentary on Leviticus. It isn’t quite as readable as Wenham’s NICOT (which is remarkable and a classic) but it’s also 30 years newer and so more engaged with what's been published since 1979. Kiuchi is to be commended for trying something a bit different - his take on holiness is fascinating and resonates with the NT well.
Marshall, I. Howard. The Gospel of Luke. NIGTC. Eerdmans, 1978.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy January 16, 2023
Though dating, it remains surprisingly readable for it's level (as long as you ignore the in-text citation/references).
Marshall, I. Howard. The Gospel of Luke. NIGTC. Eerdmans, 1978.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy January 16, 2023
Though dating, it remains surprisingly readable for it's level (as long as you ignore the in-text citation/references).
Goldingay, John. Ecclesiastes. BGWC. Cascade Books, 2021.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy January 16, 2023
A very readable and enjoyable (!) commentary on Ecclesiastes that wears its scholarship lightly, opens up the text, and bodes well for this new series.
Overland, Paul. Proverbs. ApOTC. IVP Academic, 2022.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy January 16, 2023
Whilst a technical - and Overland is particularly competent in the languages and literature of both Proverbs itself and the surrounding context - and weighty commentary, this has a devotional heart. It is relatively readable, and Overland's translation and comments are fresh, which this reader found exciting whilst reading this commentary devotionally over a month or so.
Ford, David F. The Gospel of John: A Theological Commentary. Baker Academic, 2021.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy November 8, 2022
Full review to follow. But at the end of the day it's just not that theologically engaged - which is an issue for a theological commentary. In a hundred years or so it will be a vital source for understanding British theology, anglicanism and liberal theological interpretation of Scripture - but it isn't a classic. I plan to review it fully in the new year.
Belleville, Linda L. Philippians. NCCS. Cascade Books, 2021.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy November 8, 2022
A good but brief commentary - well worth consulting but for a more exegetically rounded approach Thompson's new TNTC (replacing N. T, Wright) is the one to grab. [Full Review]
Kanagaraj, Jey J. John. NCCS. Cascade Books, 2013.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy November 8, 2022
Well worth consulting, but not particularly exciting.
Gupta, Nijay K. 1–2 Thessalonians. NCCS. Wipf & Stock, 2016.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy November 8, 2022
It's excellent, though Nijay needs to stretch his legs in a longer commentary.
Mbuvi, Andrew Mutua. Jude and 2 Peter. NCCS. Wipf & Stock, 2015.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy November 8, 2022
If you are looking for a short and readable commentary, then I think that the NCCS series is looking to me to be a good choice. Mbuvi carefully and helpfully blends serious engagement with the text with a real sense of how this text can apply to churches today. Other than some occasionally poor copy-editing (‘fairy inferno, anyone?!?!) this is a nicely put together and very readable commentary. [Full Review]
Hahn, Scott. Romans. CCSS. Baker Academic, 2017.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy November 8, 2022
As a Protestant, I wouldn’t recommend this book without the caveat that the author’s Roman Catholicism is fairly fundamental to it. That said, it is a readable, encouraging and practically-oriented commentary on the book of Romans. [Full Review]
Alexander, T. Desmond. Exodus. ApOTC. IVP Academic, 2017.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy November 8, 2022
A stunning commentary, probably the best single volume available from an evangelical perspective - and biblically-theologically engaged enough to be worth consulting beyond parameters.