ThomasCreedy

ThomasCreedy

Occupation Senior Commissioning Editor

Reviews

Kiuchi, Nobuyoshi. Leviticus. ApOTC. IVP Academic, 2007.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy February 2, 2023
This is an excellent commentary on Leviticus. It isn’t quite as readable as Wenham’s NICOT (which is remarkable and a classic) but it’s also 30 years newer and so more engaged with what's been published since 1979. Kiuchi is to be commended for trying something a bit different - his take on holiness is fascinating and resonates with the NT well.
Marshall, I. Howard. The Gospel of Luke. NIGTC. Eerdmans, 1978.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy January 16, 2023
Though dating, it remains surprisingly readable for it's level (as long as you ignore the in-text citation/references).
Marshall, I. Howard. The Gospel of Luke. NIGTC. Eerdmans, 1978.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy January 16, 2023
Though dating, it remains surprisingly readable for it's level (as long as you ignore the in-text citation/references).
Goldingay, John. Ecclesiastes. BGWC. Cascade Books, 2021.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy January 16, 2023
A very readable and enjoyable (!) commentary on Ecclesiastes that wears its scholarship lightly, opens up the text, and bodes well for this new series.
Overland, Paul. Proverbs. ApOTC. IVP Academic, 2022.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy January 16, 2023
Whilst a technical - and Overland is particularly competent in the languages and literature of both Proverbs itself and the surrounding context - and weighty commentary, this has a devotional heart. It is relatively readable, and Overland's translation and comments are fresh, which this reader found exciting whilst reading this commentary devotionally over a month or so.
Ford, David F. The Gospel of John: A Theological Commentary. Baker Academic, 2021.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy November 8, 2022
Full review to follow. But at the end of the day it's just not that theologically engaged - which is an issue for a theological commentary. In a hundred years or so it will be a vital source for understanding British theology, anglicanism and liberal theological interpretation of Scripture - but it isn't a classic. I plan to review it fully in the new year.
Belleville, Linda L. Philippians. NCCS. Cascade Books, 2021.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy November 8, 2022
A good but brief commentary - well worth consulting but for a more exegetically rounded approach Thompson's new TNTC (replacing N. T, Wright) is the one to grab. [Full Review]
Kanagaraj, Jey J. John. NCCS. Cascade Books, 2013.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy November 8, 2022
Well worth consulting, but not particularly exciting.
Gupta, Nijay K. 1-2 Thessalonians. NCCS. Wipf & Stock, 2016.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy November 8, 2022
It's excellent, though Nijay needs to stretch his legs in a longer commentary.
Mbuvi, Andrew Mutua. 2 Peter, Jude. NCCS. Wipf & Stock, 2015.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy November 8, 2022
If you are looking for a short and readable commentary, then I think that the NCCS series is looking to me to be a good choice. Mbuvi carefully and helpfully blends serious engagement with the text with a real sense of how this text can apply to churches today. Other than some occasionally poor copy-editing (‘fairy inferno, anyone?!?!) this is a nicely put together and very readable commentary. [Full Review]
Hahn, Scott. Romans. CCSS. Baker Academic, 2017.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy November 8, 2022
As a Protestant, I wouldn’t recommend this book without the caveat that the author’s Roman Catholicism is fairly fundamental to it. That said, it is a readable, encouraging and practically-oriented commentary on the book of Romans. [Full Review]
Alexander, T. Desmond. Exodus. ApOTC. IVP Academic, 2017.
ThomasCreedy ThomasCreedy November 8, 2022
A stunning commentary, probably the best single volume available from an evangelical perspective - and biblically-theologically engaged enough to be worth consulting beyond parameters.