Hebrews
Hebrews
Semi-technical
Evangelical

Hebrews

in Evangelical Biblical Theology Commentary

by Thomas R. Schreiner

5 Rank Score: 5.28 from 3 reviews, 1 featured collections, and 6 user libraries
Pages 560
Publisher Lexham Press
Published 12/13/2020
ISBN-13 9781683594307
Jesus’ final cry on the cross—“it is finished”—captures the theology of Hebrews.

Thomas R. Schreiner clarifies Hebrews’s complex argument by keeping a sustained focus on its logical flow. He interprets Hebrews in light of its prominent structures of promise and fulfillment, eschatology, typology, and the relationship between heaven and earth. Schreiner probes the letter’s unique theological contributions, such as its presentation of Jesus’ divinity and humanity, his priesthood and sacrifice, the new covenant, warnings and exhortations, and the reward for those who persevere in Christ.

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Tabb says, “This recent commentary blends Schreiner’s strengths as a seasoned professor, pastor, exegete, and biblical theologian.” Schreiner emphasizes the letter’s Christology and provides a can’t-miss 75-page overview of the central theological themes in Hebrews. [Full Review]
Bella Bella July 17, 2023
Schreiner writes his commentary in a way that presents the book almost like a sermon. This makes this commentary an easy read and allows the reader to dive further into the Word to better understand Hebrews. This commentary stands out as an impressive scholarly work that provides an insightful examination of Hebrews. Through the course of this commentary, Schreiner delivers a resource for both scholars and new believers to use to dive further into the Word. "The words of Jesus on the cross, "It is finished!" (John 19:30), capture the theology of Hebrews." Throughout this commentary, Schreiner leads the reader through Hebrews with skill and care. Carefully of the fact that his audience might be young and not understand deep theology, Schreiner breaks down complex ideas into simple theology that is easy for the reader to understand. He demonstrates a clear and deep understanding of the Greek text and provides clear explanations of the historical context and theological implications of Hebrews. By walking the reader through this, it allows the reader to gain a deeper and more accurate understanding of the interpterion of the text. "Jesus lived a truly human life, knowing human suffering and temptation. He didn't live a privileged existence separated from the anguish of temptation and the sorrows that blight human existence. He learned obedience in the midst of his sufferings and temptations." Schreiner navigates the difficult topic of the unknown author of Hebrews with careful ease while reminding the reader that canonicity is important to the Christian faith. He navigates this topic with ease while focusing more on the theme of this book. Some of the themes that were explored were the promise-fulfillment, the already-but-not-yet, and partial orientation. The part that I enjoyed most was Schreiner talking about how Hebrews is not only a call to assurance but it is also a warning. "From one angle Hebrews can be read as a call to assurance. The warnings and admonitions are also given to the reader will be convinced they are on the right path, and that they are truly clean before God by the virtue of what Christ has done. The warnings aren't meant to cast doubts about the reader's assurance but to strengthen and confirm it. The author doesn't want them to doubt whether they are Christians but to be encouraged to keep living as Christians." Schreiner's Commentary on Hebrews pays attention to the structure and theological insights that make it a valuable aid for anyone to use when diving into the depths of Hebrews. While it might have some shortcomings that I did not realize, it is a guide that will benefit scholars and new believers alike.
jamess57 jamess57 March 24, 2023
In his commentary on Hebrews, Thomas R. Schreiner describes Hebrews as a sermon or exhortation in epistolary form that exhorts its readers to hold fast to their faith. While theories of authorship are fascination and alluring, it author remains unknown. Even though we do not know the author, everyone agrees on it's canonicity and importance to the Christian faith. Schreiner explores various themes within the book including promise-fulfilment, already-but-not-yet eschatology, typology, and spatial orientation. I found his discussion on typology especially interesting and impactful. The introduction begins with an excellent summation of the story line of the Bible that sets the scene for understanding Hebrews. Hebrews has a rich theology and some of the most contested or misunderstood passages in the New Testament, such as the warning passages and apostasy. "Hence, the events, institutions, and persons in which there is a typological relationship are not merely accidents of history, nor are they simply employed by God as helpful illustrations. On the contrary, the persons, events, and institutions were intended from the beginning as anticipations of what was to come… Biblical typology is characterized by escalation. This means that the fulfilment is always greater than the type." The Evangelical Biblical Theology Commentary (EBTC) focuses on the Biblical Theology expressed by their authors on their own terms and in their own historical contexts. Biblical Theology seeks to trace the central themes of the individual books of Scripture. This commentary intends to communicate the worldview of the biblical authors and how the original audience would understand the text. In focusing on the Biblical themes instead of a verse-by-verse exegesis, you begin to see the bigger story of Scripture as it was understood when it was written. "From one angle Hebrews can be read as a call to assurance. The warnings and admonitions are also given so the readers will be convinced they are on the right path, that they are truly clean before God by virtue of what Christ has done. The warnings aren't meant to cast doubt about the readers assurance but to strengthen and confirm it. The author doesn't want them to doubt whether they are Christians but to be encouraged to keep living as Christians." Each author of the EBTC volumes is given freedom in the order and structure to best suite the biblical material being presented. Schreiner has arranged the commentary with an introduction, verse-by-verse commentary/exposition followed by the Biblical Theology themes. After reading through the commentary, I felt like it would have been beneficial to read through the Biblical Theology section before the verse-by-verse commentary. I did not understand Schreiner's position on assurance and apostasy while reading through the commentary until I read the Biblical Theology section. The commentary utilizes the author's translation for the verse to verse commentary. Each section of Scripture is broken down into the outline, Author's translation of the Scripture passage, context, exegesis, and bridge. The binding and cover art provide for a quality and aesthetically pleasing addition to anyone's library which seems trivial but I greatly appreciate it. "Jesus lived a truly human life, knowing human suffering and temptation. He didn't live a privileged existence separated from the travails of ordinary human beings. He knew the anguish of temptation and the sorrows that blight human existence. He learned obedience in the midst of his sufferings and temptations… In 2:10 Jesus is said to be perfected through his sufferings. He wasn't purified of existing sin in his sufferings since he was already without sin, but he was qualified to serve as high priest by his sufferings. Merely being without sin did not qualify Jesus to serve as high priest. He needed to experience life, to be tested, and to suffer (2:18)." Thomas R. Schreiner (PhD, Fuller Theological Seminary) is associate dean and James Buchanan Harrison Professor of New Testament Interpretation at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. Schreiner is the author of numerous commentaries and books. "He [Jesus] sympathizes 'with our weaknesses.' The word sympathy is not limited to compassion and empathy but also denotes Jesus' ability to help those who are afflicted." I highly recommend Schreiner's EBTC commentary on Hebrews for pastors, church teachers, seminary students, and those wanting a faithful and insightful commentary of Hebrews. Schreiner writes in a way that makes the complex themes of Hebrews understandable and relatable. Our understanding of Scripture should never terminate on increased knowledge only, it should confront us and change us. Hebrews does just that, it encourages us to grow in our maturity while sympathizing with our weakness and dependence on Christ who is better in every way. I received a free copy in exchange for my honest review. The opinions I express are my own and I was not required to write a positive review. [Full Review]